Waterfront: A Busy Month in Newport Harbor

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The Astor
The Astor

Boy, what a difference a year can make!

The last several years the drought we have lived through has allowed some of the warmest and best autumn, winter and spring weather any boater could dream of.

Winter and spring allowed the Blue Fin tuna to stick around within daytrip boating ventures. I can’t recall any time in my lifetime that has happened.

I have had the opportunity between rainstorms to sea-trial various yachts. For those who may not be aware, operating yachts and all their systems, from air conditioning, generators, engines, radars, G.P.S.’s, auto pilots, anchor winches, and all the other numerous systems once or twice a month will minimize expensive repairs.

My experience with airplanes in the Navy and with yachts show if they are operated regularly the maintenance costs can be hundreds of dollars, instead of thousands of dollars.

I’ve included three photos of recent events inside and just outside Newport Harbor.

Dredging
Dredging

The beautiful antique wooden schooner Astor moored off the Newport Harbor Yacht Club I haven’t seen in what seems like 20 years. A few years after boarding Astor at the Newport Harbor Yacht Club opening day, I read that the family planned to sail her around the world before their daughter became grown and moved out of the nest.

The second photo is of the Grand Canal Channel being dredged after many years. The local residents had been dismayed for a very long time that the middle of the channel was a fine grain and gooey muck that was quite shallow and not the river sand of its creation. Experience shows when the muck is gone, the local sea creatures will return to their natural environment.

Buoy tender
Buoy tender

The final photo is the United States Coast Guard Buoy Tender that had raised the bell buoy to clean and paint the steel beacon and replace the steel chain that deteriorates, just as our harbor mooring chains deteriorate.

Since the bell buoy chain is so large, they only service this chain about every five years. Our harbor mooring chains and buoys are normally serviced every two years.

The days I was away from the docks, I was pleasantly surprised that many of our local boats and owners were enjoying the change in weather and were also exercising their yachts, kayaks, skiffs and paddle boards.

When the air is warm it’s boating time in Newport Harbor. During our wet years we know to get out and enjoy nice days before the next storm arrives. Reminds me of my younger years when if a good breeze was blowing, the wind was telling us it was time to go sailing.

 Sea Ya,

Skipper Steve

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